I like gaming and cool stuff :P

10th March 2013

Photo reblogged from FUTURESCOPE with 115 notes

futuramb:


Seattle dive bar becomes first to ban Google Glass by Casey Newton, cnet.com
Owner says “it’s because it’s kind of a private place that people go.” Will other businesses follow?
Google Glass won’t be avail­able to con­sumers for months, but there’s at least one Seat­tle bar where the eye­wear will not be wel­come.
The …

Clever move to be talked about among geeks…

futuramb:

Seattle dive bar becomes first to ban Google Glass
by Casey Newton, cnet.com

Owner says “it’s because it’s kind of a private place that people go.” Will other businesses follow?

Google Glass won’t be avail­able to con­sumers for months, but there’s at least one Seat­tle bar where the eye­wear will not be wel­come.

The …

Clever move to be talked about among geeks…

Source: futuramb

8th March 2013

Photo reblogged from FUTURESCOPE with 948 notes

ralphewig:

Designer Bodies - the capabilities of 3d printing (or additive manufacturing) are reshaping entire industries. With the application of that concept to biology, the vision of designer bodies is becoming increasingly plausible. And while our current culture may obsess over the typical movie star physique, more creative minds are conjuring up not only entirely new appearances, but also advanced capabilities. Are “body by Chanel” or “performance by bodysport” in our near term future?

Need blue skin, four arms, or a tail? Want to augment and extend what you already have? Valkyrie Ice is here to help you become your own avatar. Does this idea sound too weird or far fetched? The basic technology already exists to print out custom organs, augment the body with its own cells, and much more.
[…]
Earlier in the year there was a bit of coverage in the mainstream media about breast re-construction and augmentation with stem cells when popular TV actress Suzanne Somers underwent the procedure.  Using 3D printing and related bio-constructive techniques it is already possible to design and build custom organs and other body parts. For example Anthony Atala’s talk at TED describes various methods for constructing, and printing out, human tissues, organs and other replacement parts. Many of these methods are using a persons’ own cells as a starting point so they do not carry some of the risks of prior surgical and transplant methods. Custom designed bodies and replacement parts for aesthetic appearances are entirely possible using these same exact technologies and tools.

ralphewig:

Designer Bodies - the capabilities of 3d printing (or additive manufacturing) are reshaping entire industries. With the application of that concept to biology, the vision of designer bodies is becoming increasingly plausible. And while our current culture may obsess over the typical movie star physique, more creative minds are conjuring up not only entirely new appearances, but also advanced capabilities. Are “body by Chanel” or “performance by bodysport” in our near term future?

Need blue skin, four arms, or a tail? Want to augment and extend what you already have? Valkyrie Ice is here to help you become your own avatar. Does this idea sound too weird or far fetched? The basic technology already exists to print out custom organs, augment the body with its own cells, and much more.

[…]

Earlier in the year there was a bit of coverage in the mainstream media about breast re-construction and augmentation with stem cells when popular TV actress Suzanne Somers underwent the procedure.  Using 3D printing and related bio-constructive techniques it is already possible to design and build custom organs and other body parts. For example Anthony Atala’s talk at TED describes various methods for constructing, and printing out, human tissues, organs and other replacement parts. Many of these methods are using a persons’ own cells as a starting point so they do not carry some of the risks of prior surgical and transplant methods. Custom designed bodies and replacement parts for aesthetic appearances are entirely possible using these same exact technologies and tools.

Source: hplusmagazine.com

8th March 2013

Photo reblogged from FUTURESCOPE with 57 notes

fastcompany:

A really great post about robots and journalism!
futurejournalismproject:

Can Robots Tell the Truth?
Hi, I am a student in journalism and am preparing an article about robots (like the Washington Post’s Truth Teller) validating facts instead of journalists. I am curious to know the Future Journalism Project’s point of view of about this. What are the consequences for journalists, journalism and for democracy? — Melanié Robert
Hi Melanié,
Many thanks for this fascinating question and my apologies for the delay in getting back to you. Here’s what happened:
I started thinking about this, and then I started writing about it. And then I started thinking that what I really needed to do was some reporting. You know, journalism.
I didn’t know much about the Washington Post’s Truth Teller project. For others that don’t, it’s an attempt to create an algorithm that can fact check political speeches in real time.
Since I didn’t know much about it about I got in touch and interviewed the two project leads: Steven Ginsberg, the Post’s National Political Editor, and Cory Haik, the Post’s Executive Producer for Digital News.
They gave me background on Truth Teller and how it came about, and then where they hope it leads. 
But that doesn’t really get to the sociocultural and philosophical questions you pose. So I called upon someone else. His name is Damon Horowitz.
Damon’s spent his career in both artificial intelligence and philosophy. He’s currently Google’s In-House Philosopher (seriously, it’s on his business card) and Director of Engineering. He also teaches philosophy at Columbia University.
So, after talking to these people, and thinking about it some more, I wrote a fair bit. 
You can find your answer at theFJP.org and I hope it answers some of what you’re looking for. — Michael
Have a question? Ask Away.
Image: Marvin the Paranoid Android, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.


1 word robots

fastcompany:

A really great post about robots and journalism!

futurejournalismproject:

Can Robots Tell the Truth?

Hi, I am a student in journalism and am preparing an article about robots (like the Washington Post’s Truth Teller) validating facts instead of journalists. I am curious to know the Future Journalism Project’s point of view of about this. What are the consequences for journalists, journalism and for democracy? — Melanié Robert

Hi Melanié,

Many thanks for this fascinating question and my apologies for the delay in getting back to you. Here’s what happened:

I started thinking about this, and then I started writing about it. And then I started thinking that what I really needed to do was some reporting. You know, journalism.

I didn’t know much about the Washington Post’s Truth Teller project. For others that don’t, it’s an attempt to create an algorithm that can fact check political speeches in real time.

Since I didn’t know much about it about I got in touch and interviewed the two project leads: Steven Ginsberg, the Post’s National Political Editor, and Cory Haik, the Post’s Executive Producer for Digital News.

They gave me background on Truth Teller and how it came about, and then where they hope it leads. 

But that doesn’t really get to the sociocultural and philosophical questions you pose. So I called upon someone else. His name is Damon Horowitz.

Damon’s spent his career in both artificial intelligence and philosophy. He’s currently Google’s In-House Philosopher (seriously, it’s on his business card) and Director of Engineering. He also teaches philosophy at Columbia University.

So, after talking to these people, and thinking about it some more, I wrote a fair bit. 

You can find your answer at theFJP.org and I hope it answers some of what you’re looking for. — Michael

Have a question? Ask Away.

Image: Marvin the Paranoid Android, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

1 word robots

Source: futurejournalismproject

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Photojojo ♥'s Tumblr with 517 notes

photojojo:

Whew, your DSLR doesn’t hate your phone afterall! In fact, they make an amazing team.
The Look Lock Mounts Your Phone to Your DSLR

I WANT ONE

photojojo:

Whew, your DSLR doesn’t hate your phone afterall! In fact, they make an amazing team.

The Look Lock Mounts Your Phone to Your DSLR

I WANT ONE

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from FUTURESCOPE with 101 notes

joshbyard:

Wireless, Rechargeable Brain-Computer Interface Works for Pigs, Apes: Humans Next

historically [BCIs have] been bulky and tethered to a computer. A tether limits the mobility of the patient, and also the real-world testing that can be performed by the researchers.
Brown’s wireless BCI allows the subject to move freely, dramatically increasing the quantity and quality of data that can be gathered — instead of watching what happens when a monkey moves its arm, scientists can now analyze its brain activity during complex activity, such as foraging or social interaction.
Obviously, once the wireless implant is approved for human testing, being able to move freely — rather than strapped to a chair in the lab — would be rather empowering.
Brown’s wireless BCI, fashioned out of hermetically sealed titanium, looks a lot like a pacemaker. (See: Brain pacemaker helps treat Alzheimer’s disease.) Inside there’s a li-ion battery, an inductive (wireless) charging loop, a chip that digitizes the signals from your brain, and an antenna for transmitting those neural spikes to a nearby computer. The BCI is connected to a small chip with 100 electrodes protruding from it, which, in this study, was embedded in the somatosensory cortex or motor cortex. These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away. The BCI’s battery takes two hours to charge via wireless inductive charging, and then has enough juice to last for six hours of use.

(via Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | ExtremeTech)

joshbyard:

Wireless, Rechargeable Brain-Computer Interface Works for Pigs, Apes: Humans Next

historically [BCIs have] been bulky and tethered to a computer. A tether limits the mobility of the patient, and also the real-world testing that can be performed by the researchers.

Brown’s wireless BCI allows the subject to move freely, dramatically increasing the quantity and quality of data that can be gathered — instead of watching what happens when a monkey moves its arm, scientists can now analyze its brain activity during complex activity, such as foraging or social interaction.

Obviously, once the wireless implant is approved for human testing, being able to move freely — rather than strapped to a chair in the lab — would be rather empowering.

Brown’s wireless BCI, fashioned out of hermetically sealed titanium, looks a lot like a pacemaker. (See: Brain pacemaker helps treat Alzheimer’s disease.) Inside there’s a li-ion battery, an inductive (wireless) charging loop, a chip that digitizes the signals from your brain, and an antenna for transmitting those neural spikes to a nearby computer. The BCI is connected to a small chip with 100 electrodes protruding from it, which, in this study, was embedded in the somatosensory cortex or motor cortex. These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away. The BCI’s battery takes two hours to charge via wireless inductive charging, and then has enough juice to last for six hours of use.

(via Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | ExtremeTech)

Tagged: Tech

Source: extremetech.com

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from CollegeHumor Staff Blog with 691 notes

collegehumor:

The Continuing Adventures of Florida Man [Click for more]

wtf happens in florida…

collegehumor:

The Continuing Adventures of Florida Man [Click for more]

wtf happens in florida…

6th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from CollegeHumor Staff Blog with 1,535 notes

collegehumor:

You, Me [Click for full gallery]

Understand, me and you are not on the same level. Ever

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from The Zombie Apocalypse! We Have Survived. with 197 notes

theinevitablezombieapocalypse:

O
MG
THE
ZOMB
IESARE
COMING RUN!
multiplenormgasms:

lolololololol

Survive The Zombie Apocalypse

theinevitablezombieapocalypse:

O

MG

THE

ZOMB

IESARE

COMING RUN!

multiplenormgasms:

lolololololol

Survive The Zombie Apocalypse

Source: soullesssamgasms

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Keep'n It Casual with 2,115 notes

Daft Punk 2013

Daft Punk 2013

Source: artmonia

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Galaxy Next Door with 66 notes

I loved this movie

I loved this movie

6th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from CollegeHumor Staff Blog with 599 notes

collegehumor:

The Complete History of Google [Click for more]

A behind the scenes look at how it all got started. 

6th March 2013

Photo reblogged from GeeksNGamers with 1,439 notes

geeksngamers:

Portal 2 Poster - by Sam Huckle

geeksngamers:

Portal 2 Poster - by Sam Huckle